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CW100 Images with a Strong Message (2022/2023)

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Course Information

CW100 Images with a Strong Message (2022/2023)

This Art History module provides an opportunity to explore the power of art to communicate strong messages to the public at large, be they messages of horror, disgust, belonging, order, humour, faith, hope or love.

Course Code

CW100 (2023)

Course Leader

Phil Garratt
Course Description

Module Philosophy

This Art History module provides an opportunity to explore the power of art to communicate strong messages to the public at large, be they messages of horror, disgust, belonging, order, humour, faith, hope or love. A series of case studies will focus on a selection of well-known artworks from the 15th century to the present. The study of Psychology will be central to these investigations enabling a greater understanding of how images communicate and effect individual, and group, responses. The importance of an artist’s individual psychological perspective will also be explored as will the collective power of regimes and governments to appropriate art for propaganda. By emotively engaging with particular artworks through detailed, informed, historical enquiry and discussion, it is hoped that students will be able to re-imagine the psychological force of these artworks in their time and thereby truly appreciate their significance. For more detail see the Learning Outcomes and Assessment Overview at the end of this document.

There will be seven in-person classes consisting of a lecture and activities. In addition, there will be one online class through Blackboard.

Reading                

There are two suggested books for the course (but no real need to buy both). Toby Clark’s Art and Propaganda (1997) is an easy and informative read which surveys the power of art in political and cultural movements of the 20th Century.

A very different book is Alain de Botton and Alan Armstrong’s Art as Therapy (2013) which was briefly at the centre of a new debate of the relevance of popular psychology in appreciating art as opposed to art history as a precise, learned discipline.

StartEndCourse Fee 
Public
12/10/202225/01/2023£100.00[Read More]
Staff
12/10/202225/01/2023[Read More]
Student
12/10/202225/01/2023[Read More]

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